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Who Are You?

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It’s not always apparent, but who we believe we are isn’t necessarily how others see us. We’re often so focused on the view we’ve created of ourselves that we overlook how we’ve built that perspective through intimate self-study and constant reflection over an entire lifetime. To others, we may be only a small segment of what we see in ourselves. What we project outwardly to them is what shapes their view of us. They only know us based on a handful of character traits, communication patterns, reactions to different scenarios, and the way we posture when we’re with them.

But why should any of this matter? Well, it’s an important aspect of what it is to be human. Throughout human history people have been trying to define the self through the construct we call “personality.” Many models have been developed for a variety of applications, and all of them are an attempt to make sense of the instincts and inclinations that drive unique attitudes and actions. Here’s a quick review of the progress we’ve made presented by Crash Course in Measuring Personality.

In a way, this study of personality was born from our collective need to know who we are in the world and what we are to others. It’s this body of thought that allows us to improve interpersonal communications and navigate social situations more intelligently. It’s what helps us predict what actions and reactions will occur in a relationship or certain social environment. Essentially our understanding of personality is how we navigate through the world with all its unexpected twists and turns. It’s how we predict due courses of action for ourselves and others to make everything feel a little less chaotic.

In light of that, it’s safe to say that everyone could benefit from a deeper study of the self through how others perceive us. Your Prism Portrait begins with your Primary Personality for a reason. How you show up to others is often the most celebrated aspect of ourselves. Our personality is the archetype we wear on our sleeves for all to see, whether intentional or not. This week, take a deeper dive into your Primary Personality. What are some of the strengths and blind spots you see? Whether you agree or disagree, consider how much these might actually shape another’s perspective of you.

Then when you’re good and ready, ask a close companion to take a Prism Lens on you to see how closely their view of your personality matches your own. It’s a solid way to start a conversation that just might reveal something you didn’t even know about yourself.

“Sometimes it is the people no one can imagine anything of, who do the things no one can imagine.”

― Alan Turing

Do you have an idea you want to share with an empowered community of self-aware professionals? If you’d like to contribute an idea or article to ‘In The Flow of Work’ on the Evolve blog, just send us a message or submit a post to our Head of Content, Adam Schneider

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