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The Science of Gratitude

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Some years seem to weigh more heavily on us than others. As we enter the holiday season, one-by-one reminders like this will begin to pop up, recounting the reasons to be thankful. While it’s often a friendly hint to extend goodwill to others through kindness, there’s actually a scientific reason to the season that might be worth your time and attention.

It turns out that gratitude has very real and proven positive effects. From improved self-esteem and psychological health to better sleep and physical wellbeing—gratitude can be a cure-all for what ails you. According to The Science of Gratitude from Tremendousness, gratitude rewires our brains kickstarting the production of dopamine and serotonin. Like anti-depressants, these neurotransmitters activate the “bliss” portions of the brain. And the practice of gratitude has been shown to keep the good times perpetually rolling.

Even if you’re not feeling it at the moment, research reveals that practicing micro-moments of gratitude can make us instantly feel more joyful. Better yet, we get better at it over time as it becomes easier and easier to do. That’s great news for even the most pandemic-worn ones of us all. It means, it’s never too late to start changing your mindset to take on a positive outlook. The rewards that come from gratitude are best enjoyed by the one generating it, but it’s also a practice that pulls relationships closer through authentic and thankful moments.

As you reflect on your reasons to be thankful today, take a moment to appreciate what that act of gratitude is doing for you in the long-run. That in itself is just another reason to be grateful.

“When we give cheerfully and accept gratefully, everyone is blessed.”

-Maya Angelou

Do you have an idea you want to share with an empowered community of self-aware professionals? If you’d like to contribute an idea or article to ‘In The Flow of Work’ on the Evolve blog, just send us a message or submit a post to our Head of Content, Adam Schneider

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